Uni 101: Residence Life

Hello all! As the summer wraps up, I wanted to start a series on my blog about entering university! I’ve had a lot of people ask me in the past for tips on what to expect when transitioning between high school and university, and as per usual on my blog, I’m here to share my personal experiences.

A lot of people I know are going into their first year of post-secondary (whether that be college, university, whatever you got going for you). If y’all are anything like me, it’s both incredibly exciting and terrifying! It’s exciting going off to do a new thing (especially if you’re moving away from home), but the unknowns can be daunting. This blog post is a list of tips and tricks from me, that I learned during first year, that hopefully can be helpful to you! In this first section, I’ll start with rez-life. It can be overwhelming to live on your own, but there are lots of people to help you, and little tips and tricks that will make your life a lot easier!

I lived in a “traditional-style” residence (basically, a floor with ~100 people, separated into 4 wings of ~35 people, with 3 common bathrooms [women, men, gender-neutral]) on a “living-learning community” wing made up of only music students.

Many of you will have very different experiences to mine, and by no means am I an expert, but hopefully some of the things I learned can help you out. Nothing I say is set in stone either, if something doesn’t work for you, you don’t have to use it, or you can modify it to suit your needs better!

Rez-life will be different for everyone. It all depends on who you are as a person, what kind of people you live with, what kind of building you live in, etc. Personally, I had a lot of fun in residence! I met my best friends from first year in residence, and we’ve had a blast.

I mentioned before that I lived in a traditional style residence, which for me meant that my dorm room was literally just a bedroom. The door opened right up to the common hallway. I had one roommate, and basically the room was split in half, where we both had 1 closet, 1 twin-size bed, and 1 desk with a chair. Like this:

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Here are some of things I found really helpful/useful.

1) Creating extra storage without taking up more space. You can kinda see in the picture above, but I had 3 plastic storage boxes under my bed. 2 were for clothes that I was able to fold (1 for tops, 1 for bottoms) and 1 was for snacks (non-perishables like microwavable popcorn, granola bars, etc.). I don’t have a picture of the closet in my room, but if you’re anything like me (and have millions of clothes), trust me when I say THEY WILL NOT ALL FIT. Having them stored under my bed made sure it didn’t take up any more space (you might as well use the space under your bed for something), but also let me have more of my clothes while I was away. I folded all the clothes up like they were in a dresser drawer, kinda like this:

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Pro tip: If you’re looking for a way to downsize your closet or fold clothes in a more compact, efficient way, I definitely recommend looking up the “KonMari” method!

The nice thing about having more of your clothes with you too means that you don’t have to do laundry as often (unless you run out of underwear or something LOL), which will save you lots of money, bringing me to my next point:

2) Laundry day.  For some of you, laundry will be something you’ve always done at home (like I did!) but for some of you, it’ll be your first time. It’s really useful to have some sort of laundry schedule to follow so you can make use of your resources and time most efficiently.

Pro tip: If your building uses high efficiency laundry machines (you can typically find out on rez tours or by calling the front desk) I recommend you buy liquid detergent instead of the Tide pods that some schools (like mine) recommend.

Mostly because:

  1. If the washing machine is HE, you don’t need to use as much liquid detergent as you think, meaning it will last you for a lot longer than you would think (I had 1 bottle of liquid detergent that lasted me all year).
  2. Some of my friends had experiences where the tide pods wouldn’t completely melt, and the plastic casing would get glued onto things, and they’d have to wash things again (wasting laundry credits and their time).

At my school, all residents got their first 29 credits for free (both the washing machine and dryer were 1 credit to use once) which can last you all year if you try really carefully. In total I added $10 to my laundry card, I believe, at the end of the year.

For me, I only did laundry every 2 weeks, and I only used about 3 credits at a time. I like to wash my light clothes separate from dark coloured clothes (to prevent colour bleeding), and I found it was helpful to wash both simultaneously (in 2 separate washing machines, beside each other), so that I could toss both loads in the dryer together, to save myself from using the dryer twice, when a lot of my clothes I had to hang up to dry anyway.

The best way to accomplish this is to do laundry on a weekday. Absolutely EVERYONE tries to do laundry on weekends, which can make it really difficult to do this when you live in a smaller building (my floor [which had about 100 people in total on it] only had 3 laundry machines and dryers). I liked to do my laundry on Thursday afternoons, since I finished class at 3:30.

Pro tip: The laundry machine should lock when your load is running, meaning you can leave to laundry room to go do other things instead of waiting in there. People can and will take your clothes out and dump them on the floor or on top of the machines if you don’t come back to get them though. Set a timer on your phone a few minutes before your laundry is finished so you remember to take it out and move it before that happens.

Another great way to conserve laundry credits (or not use too much money) is to take your laundry home as much as possible. This can become more difficult the farther from home you are, but if it’s possible, I would definitely recommend it. First semester has tons of holidays (Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc.) so typically, I would try to hold off from doing laundry until I was going home so I could do it at home for free. This won’t always work for everyone (my parents picked me up in their car so I could bring my laundry bin home, if you’re going home on a train/plane/bus, this won’t be incredibly ideal), but if you get the chance, definitely take it!

3) Living with a roommate. Sometime is you’re lucky, you’ll end up in a single room in residence. If that’s the case, you don’t have to share the space with anyone! But if you’re like me, you may end up sharing half of your room with someone else. Having a roommate was definitely a pleasant experience for me, though I know for many of my friends, it wasn’t. Here are some tips that I’ve compiled from living with my roommate and hearing stories from my peers.

  • Borrowing Things from Each Other: if you don’t want your roommate to use your things, let them know what is okay or not okay for them to use. My roommate let me know that I could use her mini-fridge to hold any food items that I needed, but I never borrowed any of her other things without asking right away.
  • Giving a Heads-up: there’s nothing worse than coming home to your residence  with a complete stranger in your room. You may be comfortable with having a friend, family member, or significant other hanging out in your room, but that doesn’t mean your roommate will. Always make sure to ask your roommate(s) if its okay if you have guests over, and respect their decision!
  • Respecting the Space: always remember that you share your room with someone, which means respecting the space in a way that makes your roommate feel comfortable. You may not be phased by leaving your underwear on the floor, but your roommate might.
  • Communicate Right Away: If your roommate does something to bother you, don’t let it simmer until you’re angry and bitter (trust me, it’s exhausting to be that mad all the time). Talk to your roommate calmly about what upset you, and hopefully you two can reach a compromise. This works vice versa as well. If your roommate approaches you with something, try not to be too defensive. Listen to what they have to say, so you can (hopefully!) reach a calm compromise. If that doesn’t work, your residence staff member can help by mediating a conversation between you two.

A lot of people may have grown up with their own bedroom that they didn’t have to share with anyone. Having roommates is a wonderful chance to learn what it’s like to live with someone else, and you may end up making a friend in the process! Remain calm, and keep a clear head. Your roommate is probably equally as scared to live with someone else as you are. No one is looking for trouble!

Pro tip: Most universities will ask you to fill out a short survey about your lifestyle, such as what time you sleep, if you are tidy/messy, etc. and match you up with a roommate accordingly. Trust the process no matter how scary it can be! People who are matched up by the system, rather than trying to find a roommate online find that they end up with a much better match.

4) Food and nutrition. While it may be exciting to move out for the very first time, make no mistakes. Mom and/or dad aren’t there to cook for you anymore. Many residences offer in building food in their cafeteria, and it’s great! For the first week that is. After a while, you can get tired of the food the cafeteria serves. I recommend you buy a mini fridge (or coordinate with your roommate) so that you can bring food from home too. Every time I went home my parents would bring  me food, whether that was homemade bread from my grandma, or cheese that my mom bought on sale.

Overall, residence is one of those once in a lifetime experiences that are very special. Make the most of it! Everyone’s needs are different, and these are only a guideline of what you can do, but hopefully they help!

Do you have any tips for people living in residence? Or do you have any questions about residence?

– Carole

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